Health

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The biggest question we get is how to continue exercising when injured. Injury doesn't mean you have to stop exercising. So we created a series of eBooks to guide you through the process.

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To celebrate the launch of the Training Tracker, we've distelled all the research on behaviour change down to just six steps. Follow these steps and write your future.

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As the squat has emerged from the shrouded worlds of powerlifting and strength and conditioning and entered the mainstream, one variation has been left in the shadows. The belt squat. Does the belt squat deserve a place among its more famous peers?

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There's a reason you get a dry mouth, and it can be a window into your nervous system. Understanding this can help you increase your performance.

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By understanding what triggers us to do something, we can engineer this trigger to build good habits, and modify bad habits.

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Recovering from injury can be a highly valuable opportunity to overhaul your movement patterns for long-term gain.

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The use of a lifting belt causes some controversy. But if we wade through unsupported opinions, what can the research tell us?

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What if you had the power to unlock your habits? What if you could make healthy behaviours automatic and easy? Here's how.

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There are two types of lazy. Short-term lazy. Long-term lazy. Will you choose laziness today or laziness in your future? You can't have both.

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Have you always fought the scales? Has your health journey been defined by alternating chapters of weight loss and weight gain? Well, there's a reason for it. And it's not a problem with you. Here's the answer.

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